Big Government = High Unemployment

05 February 2010 13:42:00

“High unemployment figures released recently are actually surprisingly low, given the suffocation of the New Zealand economy by government,” proclaims Peter Osborne, the Libertarianz Spokesman for Social Welfare.

“For a start the minimum wage has eliminated employment opportunities for those just wanting to get started. The first thing the National government should do is eliminate the minimum wage altogether and back this up with a $50,000 tax-free threshold.”

“Compulsory welfarism must be dismantled completely to make way for voluntary charity independent of government interference. In line with this, all of the rules, regulations and financial burdens forced upon New Zealanders should be removed. And finally the sheer size of government – all the extraneous departments and ministries – must be set upon with a chainsaw.”

“Clearly, last year’s Jobs Summit was merely a PR stunt and these results back that up. We need to understand that governments produce nothing. Instead they confiscate the wealth created by everyone else and use it to further the control and power of politicians.”

Mr Osborne concludes, “It is high time everyone realised the real burden our government, in its current form, places on our finances and our lives. Only when government has been reduced to its legitimate size and influence will we realise how much we have been held back.”

“Libertarianz understand that high unemployment is purely a product of big government. We would end big government and allow everyone to enter whatever employment agreement they wish, to create whatever they wish, and to live however they wish, providing force or fraud is not used.”

For more information contact:

Peter Osborne
Libertarianz Spokesman for Social Welfare
Phone: 021 326 091
Email: [email protected]

Libertarianz: More Freedom, Less Government
www.libertarianz.org.nz

References:

Horst, Feldmann (2009). "Government size and unemployment: Evidence from developing countries". The Journal of Developing Areas: Fall 2009.